Ben & Jerry’s… What Happened to My Spoon?

Ben and Jerry's: Where's My Spoon. Above Promotions Company. Tampa, FL

Ben and Jerry’s: Where’s My Spoon. Above Promotions Company. Tampa, FL

Yes. This is a post about ice cream. Well, sort of about ice cream. And let’s face it. I’m sort of a fan since this isn’t the first post I’ve done on Ben and Jerry’s.

I recently took a trip to Target on a hot Tampa day. Of course the Ben and Jerry’s individual sized Chocolate Fudge Brownie was the perfect solution to satisfy the desire for some cocoa and cold ice. Over the past few years, I’ve grown to love this tiny container. The convenient spoon and the ability to not eat over a serving size was the perfect combination. Until….

Ben & Jerry’s…Why?! Where is my spoon? They added more ice cream and ditched the spoon! So perhaps it isn’t as dramatic as appearing here. I mean they did add 10% more to the container. However, I miss the spoon! I actually think I prefer my spoon over the 10% more. On that hot Florida day I needed that spoon. Without the spoon, I had to maneuver in and out of traffic to rush back to the office to eat what had become only 50% ice cream, 50% liquid. Now I know. I’m now responsible for my spoon when purchasing the individual containers or Ben & Jerry’s.

Really, I’m not mad at them (anymore). I’ll still give in to the tiny containers. Let’s face it, it stays pretty warm in Florida for most of the year and who can resist Ben & Jerry’s for a lifetime. Actually, this ice cream made me think about a previous post I completed, “Bad for Business: Outdated Pricing Online.” Not that the loss of the spoon will suddenly cause customers to leave, although for me it was the plus of getting the small container, but how is it or when is it good to notify your faithful fans about changes in your products is what came to mind.

This change wasn’t announced on their social media pages. There was no press release available online nor a special newscast to say “there is now 10% more ice cream in the cup” and “oh, you no longer get the spoon.” Oh, little spoon, you will be missed. Rest in Peace little spoon. You will be missed, but your demise gave me a chance to remind businesses about the importance of letting your brand ambassadors and clients know when positive or negative changes occur. Also, about how a product will be received by the public when you do not inform them.

It is important for businesses to utilize their social media pages, email newsletters, phone calls, website and even the media to get the word out. Do what you can to phase the public in or keep them in the loop to changes. If not, your product may lose out on future sales.

Perhaps, now I’ll receive a phone call going forward letting me know about future changes. Ha! Wouldn’t that be something? A phone call from Ben or Jerry. (Please note: my obsession with their ice cream goes beyond the fact it is excellent, but I love their story on how they started, their growth, love of the environment and charitable efforts.)

What do you think? Is my spoon being removed something I shouldn’t have thought to hear about from Ben and Jerry’s? How do you notify your customers or fans about changes to your organization?

Leave your comment below and you may be featured in a future post.

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Above Promotions is a full service publicity, marketing and promotions company, founded with the purpose to serve an array of clients that are looking to expand their presence in the marketplace. From a local to international market, Above Promotions Company can provide the exposure that goes above your expectations. Visit Above Promotions Company today.

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Ebony T. Grimsley is the Creative Director and Owner of Above Promotions Company. She is also the author of “Because You’re Small: Effective Marketing Strategies for Immediate Implementation.” To find out more information on the book, please visit http://www.abovepromotions.com or purchase online at Amazon, Booktango and other online bookstores.

 

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Comments
6 Responses to “Ben & Jerry’s… What Happened to My Spoon?”
  1. That’s funny, I am sorry for your loss. :-) I think perhaps they didn’t realize how important the little guy was to the people who love their product. They figured, we’ll give you more of what you love & no one would miss the spoon. I used all of my social media platforms to let people know I was rebranding but Ithink changing your entire look from your logo to the entire focus is something that needed to be shared but I think if I’d kept the old look & switched to being a vlog instead of a blog the people who visit would have just figured that out on their own. Kinda like (put a spoon in your new purse) tee hee I coudn’t resist

  2. The spoon struggle is real Kellie. It’s real.

  3. Xiomara @ Parkesdale says:

    Wow! It’s been a while since I’ve purchased Ben & Jerry’s. So, I was not aware of this change in procedure. :) At our market, we communicate changes with our customers by posting on Facebook and twitter, send out an email campaign and signage through our store.

  4. Harvey Davis says:

    I demand answers. This has got to be some hippie bullshit where the cost to manufacture the spoons is greater than the cost of 10% more ice cream because they refuse to use superior Chinese labor.

    The spoon was half the appeal of the single serving size. I buy these in the first place because I cant trust myself to properly manage portions, and the little spoon made the reasonable single portion last as long as the bow I would have filled and shoveled into my mouth with a tablespoon.

    These fuckers are taking psychedelic drugs at music festivals while I am bitterly sitting at home accelerating the onset of my adult diabetus.

  5. That’s a good way to keep customers informed.

  6. Interesting outlook on it. Thanks Harvey.

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